Are Bigger Home Parties – Better Parties?

Susie Nelson Training, Direct Sales Training, Home Party Business, Social Selling Business

When it comes to the number of guests at your parties – Bigger is NOT always Better.

One of the things I LOVE about working with my private coaching students is that I’m reminded of so many lessons I’ve learned along the way…(and it helps me to share them with my entire family of consultants who follow my training).

A couple weeks ago, I was talking with a student who is really new in the business (and doing a great job – just sponsored her first team member) and she was really excited because she had connected with a new hostess who wanted to bring two of her friends in on the party – so there would probably be about 30 people in attendance….YIKES!

I was so proud of this student – and didn’t want her to be discouraged (I love it when consultants take action and make this happen.), but we talked through the reasons why this wasn’t really the best route to take – and I want to share them with you today.

1) The biggest challenge of a group that size is it cuts into the amount of time you can spend with each customer at the private closing table.

That’s the place where the magic really happens. You get to connect with them, one-on-one, and learn more about them. Not only are you making a new friend, but this is really helpful as you move into the recruiting process.

When you can spend a little bit of time with each guest – you can also build each customer’s orders by simply suggesting additional items that complement what she’s selected – plus you can remind her of any specials your company might be offering. You’ll be amazed at how much you can increase the sales simply by mentioning these things.

It also means you are rushed with your booking conversation. Or, if the guests are simply filling out order forms and throwing them at you with their payments – you don’t get to ask about bookings at all! Bad, bad, bad.

You want to be able to ask each guest to book – and if she has any kind of “objection” or problem that is preventing her from booking – solve it and get her date on your calendar!

The most detrimental part (although all of these points are important) is not being able to have the “sponsoring” talk. For me that’s asking the person to take a closer look at the information about your business.

2) A second challenge: when your attendance is too big – your order per customer will decrease.

In my former direct sales business, my personal ideal party size was 8.

Don’t get me wrong – I didn’t tell my hostesses that they couldn’t have more than eight guests in attendance – but my average sales per customer at the bigger parties normally dropped. (Yes – even though I no longer work as an engineer – the numbers geek in me often pops up to the surface.)

3) It can look chaotic to prospects.

Remember – you always want everyone who is watching you to say to themselves, “I think I can do what she does.” If there are too many guests at the party, and you’re getting pulled several directions with questions or guests who need to leave early – it might not look “simple, easy and fun” to anyone who might be considering your business.

In my coaching students’ case – we talked about having a discussion with her new hostess – and suggesting that her two friends each book their own party (giving her credit for those bookings). If she was insistent on proceeding with the big group – she could bring along a new team member, or make her hostess her “potential team member in training” that night – and ask her to help!

Comments

  1. I agree whole-hearted about attendance numbers. Where having large numbers helps ensure you have great PV, the personal experience is lost. I have found that my most “intimate” parties (meaning attendance of 5-8) get me the best results. I have been able to up sell much better and chances of gaining a new teammate is much better. Where large PV is great, your return is much greater as you build your team.

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